Academics

Aisling Swaine

Aisling Swaine is Associate Professor of Practice of International Affairs at the Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University, Washington DC.

Aisling specializes in issues of violence against women related to armed conflict; feminist legal theory and transitional justice; and the women, peace and security agenda, most notably on national action plans. Prior to her current post, Aisling worked extensively with the United Nations and aid organisations in humanitarian settings globally, as well as at international policy levels. Aisling has a forthcoming book titled: Conflict-Related Violence Against Women: Transforming Transition (Cambridge University Press, 2016).

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Amy Barrow

Amy Barrow is Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Law at The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK), where she is a founding member of the Centre for Rights and Justice (CRJ) as well as a member of the Gender Research Centre and the Centre for Civil Society Studies.

Amy’s research expertise includes UN Security Council Resolution 1325 and the development of norms on women, peace and security; gender and the law; human rights; institutional mechanisms for the advancement of women, and socio-legal research methods. Amy has a keen interest in how international law filters down to the grass-roots level, and is used by multiple actors in society. Amy is a member of the WILPF 1325 Working Group.

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Annick Wibben

Annick Wibben is Associate Professor of Politics at the University of San Francisco (USF) where she also directs the Peace & Justice Studies program. Previously, she was a fellow at the Watson Institute for International Studies at Brown University.

She writes and researches broadly in the area of feminist and critical security studies and also has a keen interest in issues of methodology, representation, and writing. Her first book, Feminist Security Studies: A Narrative Approach was published in 2011 and her edited collection Researching War: Feminist Methods, Ethics & Politics is forthcoming in 2016.

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Carmen Magallón

Carmen Magallón is the Director of the SIP Foundation, a research center on International Relations and Peace, based in Zaragoza, Spain. She is a physicist with a long experience teaching Physics and holds a PhD in History and Philosophy of Science. She has been editor of the Pacifist Journal En pie de paz and elected member to the Council of War Resister’s International where she served for some years.

Her research focuses on the historical contributions of women to Peace and Science, and the relationship between gender, science and culture of peace. She has lectured at universities of Spain and Latin America.

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Carol Cohn

Carol Cohn is the founding director of the Consortium on Gender, Security and Human Rights, and a leader in the scholarly community addressing issues of gender in global politics, armed conflict and security.  Her research interests have focused on gender integration issues in the US military, feminist approaches to thinking about weapons of mass destruction, the gender dimensions of contemporary armed conflicts, the concept of “vulnerability” in security and humanitarian discourse, and gender mainstreaming in international peace and security institutions.

In addition to her research, Carol conducts training and workshops on 1325 and provides consultancy on gender mainstreaming for institutions such as the UN Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO).

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Carrie Reiling

Carrie Reiling is a PhD candidate in the Department of Political Science at the University of California, Irvine. Her research interests include feminist and postcolonial theory, international organizations, international law and governance, West Africa, and the UN Security Council Resolutions on Women, Peace, and Security.

Carrie’s dissertation research specifically focuses on the role that NGOs play in implementing the UN Security Council’s Women, Peace, and Security agenda and how NGOs’ work interacts with the state and international community. She conducted her dissertation fieldwork in Côte d’Ivoire, sponsored by a Fulbright fellowship.

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Catia Confortini

Catia Confortini is Assistant Professor of Peace and Justice Studies at Wellesley College. She is currently serving as chair of the Women’s Caucus in International Studies of the International Studies Association. She is WILPF’s Vice President 2015-2018.

Her research focuses on the contribution of women’s peace activism to peace studies as an academic field and as a practice. Her recent book entitled Intelligent Compassion: the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom and Feminist Peace (Oxford University Press 2013) examines gendered understandings of peace in WILPF. Her most recent project entitled Bio-Pink: Gender, Power and the Transnational Diffusion of Breast Cancer Governance in Nigeria, explores the diffusion of biomedical and pink ribbon cultures of breast cancer. For this project she has been awarded an American Post-doctoral Research Fellowship from the American Association of University Women.

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Christine Chinkin
Christine Chinkin

Christine Chinkin is Professor of International Law at the London School of Economics and a barrister, a member of Matrix Chambers. Together with H. Charlesworth, she won the American Society of International Law, 2005 Goler T. Butcher Medal ‘for outstanding contributions to the development or effective realization of international human rights law’.

Her current research interests are gender and post-conflict reconstruction; the political and legal aspects of human security; and the application of the Convention on Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, 1979 by CEDAW and by the UK government.

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Claire Duncanson

Claire Duncanson is a Senior Lecturer in International Relations at the University of Edinburgh. Prior to her academic career, she worked for a variety of human rights and international development NGOs, including Amnesty International, Jubilee 2000 and Global Perspective.

Claire’s research interests lie at the intersection of international security, IR theory and gender politics. Her work applies new theoretical insights about feminism, gender, and, in particular, masculinities, to current international issues, such as military interventions, peacebuilding and nuclear proliferation. Her publications include Forces for Good? Military Masculinities and Peacebuilding in Afghanistan and Iraq (Palgrave Macmillan 2013) and Gender and Peacebuilding (Polity 2016).

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Cynthia Cockburn

Cynthia Cockburn is a feminist researcher, writer and photographer based in London. She is a Visiting Professor at City University London, and an Honorary Professor in the Centre for the Study of Women and Gender, University of Warwick.

Her projects are designed to contribute to social movements, particularly community activism, trade unionism, the women’s and peace. Her recent work, including her book Antimilitarism: Political and Gender Dynamics of Peace Movements (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012), focuses on gender in processes of war and peace.

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Cynthia Enloe

Cynthia Enloe is Research Professor at Clark University in Massachusetts (USA). She advises students and teaches in the combined programs of International Development, Politics and Women’s and Gender Studies.

Among her recent books are “Nimo’s War, Emma’s War: Making Feminist Sense of the Iraq War,” (2010), “Seriously! Investigating Crashes and Crises as if Women Mattered” (2013) and a new updated version of “Bananas, Beaches and Bases,” (2014). Her books and articles have been translated into Turkish, Korean, Japanese, Swedish and French.

Cynthia has taught in Japan, Guyana, New Zealand, the UK and Canada and has been interviewed on the feminist approaches to women’s lives in war zones and post-war societies, as well as on gendered “peacetime” militarization on NPR, BBC and Al Jazeera.

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Denise Horn

Denise M. Horn is an Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Relations at Simmons College in Boston, MA. She is the author of Democratic Governance and Social Entrepreneurship: Civic Participation and the Future of Democracy (Routledge 2013) and Women, Civil Society and the Geopolitics of Democratization (Routledge 2010).

Her work explores the relationship of civil society development to democratic growth, focusing on women’s transnational activism and trends in global development strategies, such as social entrepreneurship. She has facilitated workshops in social entrepreneurship and community development in Thailand, Indonesia and India. Denise is a 2014 Fulbright Senior Scholar, where she conducted seminars in Democratization and Human Rights at Universitas Andalas, in West Sumatra, Indonesia. She currently serves on the editorial board for Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society.

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Dyan Mazurana

Dyan Mazurana is Associate Research Professor at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University and Research Director of Gender, Youth and Community at the Feinstein International Center, Tufts University, USA. She is also the Cathy Cohen Lasry Visiting Professor of Comparative Genocide Studies at the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts.

Mazurana’s areas of specialty include women, children and armed conflict, documenting serious crimes committed during conflict, and accountability, remedy and reparation. She has published more than seventy scholarly and policy books, articles, and international reports in numerous languages.

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Elisabeth Porter

Elisabeth Porter is a Professor at University of South Australia, teaching courses on international relations and peace, justice and reconciliation. Previously, she was Research Director at INCORE, Northern Ireland.

She writes on women’s peacebuilding and reconciliation, highlighting women’s achievements in informal settings. Currently, her research is on understanding how women’s faith-based peacebuilding, in tandem with feminist groups, can assist local implementation of UNSCR 1325. Her most recent books include Connecting Peace, Justice & Reconciliation (Lynne Rienner, 2015), Peace and Security: Implications for Women (with Anuradha Mundkur, University of Queensland Press, 2012) and Peacebuilding: Women in International Perspective (Routledge, 2007).

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Elisabeth Prügl

Elisabeth Prügl is Professor of International Relations at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva and the Director of the Institute’s Programme on Gender and Global Change (PGGC).

Prügl’s research focuses on gender politics in international relations and global governance. Author of Transforming Masculine Rule: Agriculture and Rural Development in the European Union, her research deals with gender expertise in international organisations, agrarian change and gender, conflict prevention and gender, and the neoliberalisation of feminist movement ideas.

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Emma Rosengren

Emma Rosengren is a PhD Student at the Department of Economic History, Stockholm University, Sweden. Her dissertation addresses the relationship between gender, nuclear weapons and disarmament, using the Swedish nuclear experience as a case study.

After receiving her Master Degree in International Relations from Stockholm University in 2008, Emma worked on disarmament policy for the Swedish Section of WILPF and for the Swedish branch of the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (IPPNW). Emma’s research interests include feminist theory, nuclear weapons, disarmament and peace movements.

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Gorana Mlinarević

Gorana Mlinarević is a researcher on the Gender of Justice Project, Goldsmiths, University of London.

Her interdisciplinary research focuses on the prosecution of wartime sexual violence and war and post-war issues and experiences affecting women. She often explores intersections and tensions between identity politics and economic and social realities of the post-war societies. In 2009 together with Gabriela Mischkowski she co-authored the study “… and that it those not happen to anyone anywhere in the world” The Trouble with Rape Trials – Views of Witnesses, Prosecutors and Judges on Prosecuting Sexualized Violence during the War of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Hilary Charlesworth
Hilary Charlesworth

Hilary Charlesworth is an Australian Research Council Fellow and Director of the Centre for International Governance and Justice in the Regulatory Institutions Network at the Australian National University. She also holds an appointment as Professor of International Law and Human Rights in the ANU College of Law. Her research interests are in international law and human rights law, particularly feminist approaches to these areas.

Hilary has worked with non-governmental human rights organisations on ways to implement international human rights standards. She is Judge ad hoc of the International Court of Justice in the Whaling in the Antarctic case.

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Jacqui True

Jacqui True is a Professor of Politics and International Relations and an Australian Research Council Future Fellow in the School of Social Sciences at Monash University, Australia.

She specialises in gender and international political economy, women, peace and security, and violence against women. Her current research is focused on the political economy of post-conflict violence against women and the patterns of systemic sexual and gender-based violence in Asia Pacific conflict-affected countries. Her recent books include The Political Economy of Violence Against Women (Oxford University Press, 2012), which won the American Political Science Association’s 2012 biennial prize for the best book in human rights,and Scandalous Economics: The Politics of Gender and Financial Crises (Oxford University Press, 2016) edited with Aida Hozić.

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Janie Leatherman

Janie Leatherman is professor of politics and international studies. She is Director of the Fulbright program at Fairfield University and also Project Director of Collaborative Project in Student Learning: The Examination of Enduring Questions through Humanitarian Education (Teagle Foundation Grant).

Janie’s consultancy in conflict resolution include the U.S. Ambassador-at-Large for War Crimes, the United Nations University, Catholic Relief Services, Search for Common Ground, the Brookings Institution, and the Council on Foreign Relations. Her current research project includes a book contract for “Global Peace Studies” (for Polity Press). She also has projects underway on border politics and migration, safe spaces in humanitarian contexts, and sexual violence and armed conflict.

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Joy Ada Onyesoh

Joy Ada Onyesoh conducts research for her doctoral degree in Transformative Studies and is studying for a degree in LLB Law. She is currently affiliated at the Institute of Development Studies University of Nigeria and California Institute of Integral Studies, USA.

She is the President of Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom in Nigeria and the Executive Director of Women for Skill Acquisition Development and Leadership Organisation. Joy is particularly invested in the full implementation of UNSCR 1325 and has facilitated translation into four Nigerian Indigenous languages.

Karen Barnes Robinson

Karen Barnes Robinson is an independent consultant and is currently a Research Associate with the Overseas Development Institute. Her research interests focus on gender, peacebuilding and statebuilding; governance and security in fragile states; and the implementation of UNSCR 1325.

Karen holds a PhD in International Relations from the London School of Economics. Karen has ten years of experience in research, policy and programming relating to gender and peacebuilding and has published widely on these issues. She has recently worked for organisations such as DFID, International Alert, the EU and the OECD.

Katrina Lee-Koo
Katrina Lee-Koo is Associate Professor of International Relations at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia and Deputy Director of Monash GPS (Gender, Peace and Security) Research Centre.

Kate works on the implementation of the women, peace and security agenda, with a focus upon the Asia Pacific. Currently, her projects examine the implementation of gender provisions in peace agreements, and the impacts of supporting young women’s leadership in the Asia Pacific.  She has been involved in the development and monitoring of the Australian National Action Plan and has been responsible for the writing of civil society’s annual shadow report on the NAP.

Laura Shepherd
Laura J. Shepherd

Laura J. Shepherd is an Associate Professor of International Relations at the School of Social Sciences at the University of New South Wales. Laura has written extensively on the formulation of UNSCR1325 and subsequent Women, Peace and Security resolutions, and is currently working on gender and peace-building, with a focus on civil society engagement.

She is interested in post-structural accounts of gender, international relations and security. Much of her work investigates authority, legitimacy and power through these frameworks. Laura co-founded the Women, Peace and Security Academic Collective and the Gender in Global Governance Net-Work.

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Laurie R. Cohen

Laurie R. Cohen is an independent historian. After finishing graduate work in Russian Studies at Yale University, she completed a PhD at the University of Vienna in East European history. Since then she initiated research projects on the first woman Nobel Peace prize laureate Bertha von Suttner, which led to a number of publications and guest lectures as well as to a further project on transnational women’s peace movements in the first half of the twentieth century.

She also teaches courses on gender studies, transnational women’s movements, and women and war in the twentieth century at the Universities of Innsbruck and Klagenfurt.

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Lynette A. Jackson

Lynette A. Jackson is an Associate Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies and African American Studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She also serves on boards and advisory committees addressing human rights and social justice, including the Chicago Committee of Human Rights Watch, and The Public Square, which is the City of Chicago’s Refugee and Immigrant Advisory Committee.

Lynette’s research interests focus on African History, Africa women’s and gender studies, the history and politics of health in Africa and gender and forced migration in Sudan.

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Marilou McPhedran

Marilou McPhedran is currently a professor and the founding Director of the Institute for International Women’s Rights at The University of Winnipeg Global College, Canada. She was seconded to the UNFPA-Geneva Office as their human rights specialist in 2012 and was a visiting professor at the University for Peace in Costa Rica in 2013.

She is a Member of the Order of Canada for co-leadership on gender equality amendments to the Canadian constitution, a co-founder of LEAF, the Women’s Legal Education and Action Fund, founder of the International Women’s Rights Project. She served as Chief Commissioner of the Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission (2007-8) and Principal of Global College (2008-2012).

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Natalie Hudson

Natalie Hudson is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Dayton, Ohio, where she also serves as the Director of the Human Rights Studies Program. Her expertise has led to consultancy work for governmental and nongovernmental organizations, including the European Union and the United Nations.

Natalie’s research interests focus on women’s activism in the global security arena, particularly in the context of the United Nations, and on the meaning, significance and applicability of human security in the 21st century.

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Nicola Pratt

Nicola Pratt is a Reader of the International Politics of the Middle East at the University of Warwick, UK. She is joint leader of the ‘Reconceptualising Gender: Transnational Perspectives’ research network between Warwick and Birzeit University (Palestine).

Nicola is interested in the intersection  of Middle East politics and feminist international relations theory. She has written on democratization, human and women’s rights, and peace and security in a number of Middle Eastern countries. Her research focuses on the geopolitical dimensions of gender and the gender dimensions of geopolitics in the Arab world.

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Paula Drumond

Paula Drumond is a PhD candidate at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies (IHEID, Geneva) and researcher of the Global South Unit for Mediation (PUC-Rio, Brazil). Paula has previously worked as a lecturer at PUC-Rio and as a Policy Assistant at Action Aid’s office for Latin America.

Her research focuses on gendered dynamics of violence, security, and conflict resolution. More specifically, Paula’s dissertation unpacks the phenomenon of conflict-related sexual violence against men. Her publications in English and Portuguese center broadly on gender and international security, and include book chapters published by Routledge, IPEA and Edward Elgar.

Peace A. Medie

Peace A. Medie is a Research Fellow in the Legon Centre for International Affairs and Diplomacy at the University of Ghana and an Oxford-Princeton Global Leaders Fellow.

Her research focuses on how states and non-state actors respond to violence against women. Her book manuscript, Global Norms and Local Action: The Campaigns to End Violence against Women in Africa, examines how international organizations and the women’s movement have influenced the implementation of gender-based violence norms in Liberia and CÔte d’Ivoire. Her research has been published in African Affairs, Politics & Gender, and International Studies Review.

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Radhika Balakrishnan

Radhika Balakrishnan is Faculty Director at the Center for Women’s Global Leadership and Professor in Women’s and Gender Studies at Rutgers University. She has a Ph.D. in Economics from Rutgers University. She is on the Board of the Center for Constitutional Rights and is Commissioner for the Commission for Gender Equity for the City of New York, and on the Civil Society Advisory Committee for the United Nations Development Program.

Radhika is the co-editor with Diane Elson of Economic Policy and Human Rights: Holding Governments to Account (Zed Books, 2011). She edited The Hidden Assembly Line: Gender Dynamics of Subcontracted Work in a Global Economy (Kumarian Press, 2001), co-edited Good Sex: Feminist Perspectives from the World’s Religions, with Patricia Jung and Mary Hunt (Rutgers University Press, 2000). Her research and advocacy work has sought to change the lens through which macroeconomic policy is interpreted and critiqued by applying international human rights norms to assess macroeconomic policy.

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Sandra McEvoy

Sandra McEvoy is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Wheelock College. Before coming to Wheelock, Sandra served as Associate Director of the Consortium on Gender, Security and Human Rights at UMass Boston.

Sandra’s research focuses on women’s participation in political violence and gender-focused strategies that incorporate perpetrators of political violence into long-term conflict resolution strategies. Currently, Sandra is preparing a book manuscript that documents Loyalist women’s participation in paramilitary organisations in Northern Ireland during the 30-year conflict in the country.

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Soumita Basu

Soumita Basu is Assistant Professor of International Relations at the South Asian University, New Delhi. She also currently serves as an Associate Editor of the International Feminist Journal of Politics.

Her primary areas of research are the UN, feminist IR, and critical security studies, with particular focus on UNSCR 1325. Her work has been published in a number of edited volumes as well as International Affairs, International Studies Perspectives and the International Studies Compendium. Outside academia, Soumita has worked with Women in Security, Conflict Management and Peace, New Delhi, and WILPF PeaceWomen programme, New York.

Susan Jackson
Susan Jackson

Susan Jackson is Researcher of International Relations at Stockholm University, Sweden. Her research focuses on militarization and the global political economy with emphasis on the role of corporations in general and arms producers in particular.

Susan leads the Militarization 2.0 project, a four-year, 20m Swedish kronor (approx $3m) research project investigating militarization’s social media footprint through a gendered lens. The project includes researchers from Leeds University (UK), Leibniz University and Seigen University (both in Germany) and is part of the digitized societies framework grants funded by the Swedish Science Research Council (Vetenskapsrådet).

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Vanessa Farr

Vanessa Farr is an independent consultant and has been Lead Researcher on the WILPF MENA 1325 Project since its inception. She was the first global Gender and Conflict Advisor at UNDP’s Bureau for Crisis Prevention and then Social Development and Gender Advisor at UNDP’s Programme of Assistance to the Palestinian People. Prior to that, she was lead editor and senior gender advisor on the UN’s Integrated DDR Standards (IDDRS), first published in 2006.

Vanessa now works on the gendered impacts of conflict, women in peace-building and women and governance in conflict and post-conflict settings, specialising in Africa and the Middle East.

Wening Udasmoro

Wening Udasmoro is Associate Professor in Literature at Universitas Gadjah Mada in Indonesia. She was the Associate Director of the ICRS that works on the issues of interfaith dialogue and peacebuilding process using the Social Science approach.

Her interests of research are on gender, religion, violence, identity politics and critical discourse analysis. Among her new publications is Symbolic Violence in Everyday Narration published in Asian Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities. She is involved in the research on Gender Dimensions of Social Conflict, Armed Violence and Peace building together with the team of Graduate Institute Geneva and Nigeria.

 
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