WILPF’s recommendations for the Universal Periodic Review of Norway

January 10, 2014

As a peace organisation, WILPF believes that peace and security are inextricably linked and a precondition to human rights. The basic causes of conflict will only be solved through the implementation of human rights.

National Institution on Human Rights

The Norwegian Centre for Human Rights at the University of Oslo has since 2001 had the status of a national institution in Norway. However, last year the UN degraded this institution from A to B status. Degradation means that the Norwegian Centre for Human Rights no longer has the right to speak in the various UN monitoring bodies. With B status, the Centre can no longer vote in the international network and cannot receive positions in this system.

For a national human rights institution to achieve A status, it must satisfy the so-called Paris Principles. According to these principles, the National Institution (NI) must be regulated by a separate act, it must be assured influence through institutionalised channels as well as being a visible driving force and receiving sufficient funding.

WILPF Norway is pleased to see that the work on a NI has come a long way, resulting in a thorough document on hearing earlier this year. Now we look forward to the finalising of the process of reestablishing a NI with A status in Norway. For our organisation the main thing is that a good organisation and structure is developed – not how – so that a NI can be an independent and clear voice in the UN system in accordance with the rights granted to independent national institutions.

In this context, the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom suggests the following recommendation for the UPR of Norway:

  • Intensify efforts to re-establish a National Institution for human rights in accordance with the Paris Principles.
Gender Equality

WILPF Norway believes it is important, as does the draft State report for the UPR of September 2013 in paragraph 3.1.2., to highlight sexual harassment of young girls/women as a social problem. For instance, ‘cyberbullying’ is limiting young womens’ freedom, and we believe that measures to combat this and other forms of sexual harassment must be taken.

It is important to note that the final State report to the UPR does not include this part on sexual harassment and is different to the draft State report that NGOs were called to comment on.

In this context, the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom suggests the following recommendation for the UPR of Norway:

  • Take concrete measures to end sexual harassment of young girls and women.
 Norwegian Priorities Internationally

Regarding the continuation of Norwegian efforts for the promotion and protection of women’s human rights internationally, WILPF Norway believes that it is important that Norway in this work actively supports the national implementation of UN Security Council Resolution 1325. Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security has as its overall objective to increase women’s participation and influence in preventing, managing and resolving conflicts. The resolution will also help to protect women’s human rights during war and conflict and integrate the gender perspective in peace-building work.

In this context, the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom suggests the following recommendation for the UPR of Norway:

  • Actively support the implementation of the UN Security Council Resolution 1325 at the national level.

 

Contact us:

María Muñoz Maraver, WILPF International: mmunoz@wilpf.ch

Kari Nes, WILPF Norway: kari.nes@hihm.no

 

Gender Based Violence UNSCR 1325 Europe Norway UPR Statement

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