CSO JOINT STATEMENT 3rd SESSION OF THE WORKING GROUP ON THE RIGHT TO PEACE

May 7, 2015

Mr. Chairman,

I deliver this statement on behalf of the undersigned civil society organisations:

In May 2014, the Chairperson-Rapporteur of the Working Group on the Right to Peace submitted his first draft Declaration of the United Nations on the Right to Peace to the second session of the Working Group, held from 30 June to 4 July 2014.

In the same session, the civil society organisations expressed our disappointment with the proposed text, since it did not recognize explicitly the human right to peace and did not mean any progression in the current state of international law1. Despite this, the discussion held at the Working Group did not make any substantial change to the draft of the Chairperson.

Since then, civil society organisations have expressed our dissatisfaction with the codification process, based on three main reasons2:

  • –  Firstly, the draft submitted by the Chairperson was a departure from the mandate of the Working Group, which, according to resolution 20/15 of the Human Rights Council, of 5 July 2012, was “progressively negotiating a draft United Nations declaration on the right to peace, on the basis of the draft submitted by the Advisory Committee…”
  • –  Secondly, since it did not recognise the human right to peace as an autonomous right, the Chairperson’s draft did not mean any progression in the current state of international human rights law. On the contrary, it constituted a step backwards with regard to the General Assembly Declarations on the Preparation of Societies to Life in Peace (1978) and on the Right of Peoples to Peace (1984).
  • –  Thirdly, as it did not include any monitoring body, it did not guarantee the implementation of the future Declaration, reducing it to a pure declaration of intent.

    The second draft submitted by the Chairperson-Rapporteur to the third session of the Working Group3 is flawed by the same reasons. Even if the preamble includes new relevant elements, now its unbalance with the operative part is more evident.

    In particular, we welcome the references of the preamble, inter alia, to the Declaration on the Preparation of Societies for Life in Peace, the Declaration on the Right of Peoples to Peace, and the Declaration and Programme of Action on a Culture of Peace4,

    1 See the second session report: A/HRC/27/63. Distributed on 8 July 2014.

    2 See joint written statements submitted to the Human Rights Council at its 27th and 28th sessions: A/HRC/27/NGO/100 and A/HRC/28/NGO/40.
    3 20-24 April 2015.

    4 Preambular paragraph 4.

as well as the reference to the concept of positive peace5, and notably the affirmation of the right to live in peace6, on the same terms as the 1978 Declaration.

However, we consider that the operative part of the draft declaration continues to be insufficient, as it has only four articles, two of them dealing with its implementation and interpretation.

The most relevant modification in regard to the previous draft is Article 1, which now states that: “Everyone is entitled to enjoy peace and security, human rights and development”.

We consider that this wording does not mean any progression in the actual state of international human rights law, since in 1978 the General Assembly recognized the right of every human being to life in peace, and in 1984 it solemnly proclaimed the “sacred right to peace” of all peoples.

Therefore, we propose to come back to the Declaration on the right to peace adopted in April 2012 by the Advisory Committee7, whose Article 1 recognized that “Individuals and peoples have a right to peace. This right shall be implemented without any distinction or discrimination…”.

Then, the same Declaration defined the essential elements of the human right to peace, in accordance with those developed by international civil society in the Santiago Declaration on the Human Right to Peace, of 10 December 2010. Both documents identified the following essential elements, that should be incorporated to the operative part of the Chairperson-Rapporteur’s draft declaration: the right to human security; the right to disarmament; the right to peace education and training; the right to conscientious objection to military service; the right to resistance and opposition to oppression; the duty to regulate the conduct and responsibilities of both private military and security companies and peacekeeping missions; the right to development; the right to environment; the right of victims of human rights violations to truth, justice, reparation and guarantees of non-repetition; the rights of individuals belonging to vulnerable groups; and the rights of refugees and migrants.

Article 2 establishes the obligation of the States to respect, implement and promote equality and non-discrimination, justice and the rule of law and to guarantee freedom from fear and want as a means to build peace within and between societies.

We welcome the reference to the concept of human security, as defined by the UNPD8: freedom from fear and from want; as well as the reference to basic principles of international human rights law, such as equality and non-discrimination, justice and rule of law. However, those principles were already affirmed in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the Millennium Declaration, or the 2005 World Summit Outcome.

Therefore, we propose those principles to be developed in accordance with Articles 2 and subsequent of the Advisory Committee Declaration on the Right to Peace, and Articles 3 and subsequent of the Santiago Declaration on the Human Right to Peace.

5 Preambular paragraph 9.
6 Preambular paragraph 24.
7 Document A/HRC/20/31, 16 April 2012.
8 UNPD, Human Development Report, 1994, p. 27.

Article 3 imposes the obligation to take appropriate sustainable measures to act, support and assist in achieving the Declaration to the United Nations and its specialized agencies, international, regional, national and local organizations and civil society in general.

Nevertheless, States are the main duty-holders of the human right to peace, so they cannot be excluded from the enumeration of Article 3. States have a fundamental responsibility concerning the effective respect, guarantee and realization of all human rights, including the human right to peace. Denying this responsibility, or just omitting any reference to it is a clear setback in international human rights law and undermines the scope of Art. 56 of the UN Charter9.

Therefore, as the Santiago Declaration and the Advisory Committee Declaration, Article 3 of the Chairperson’s draft declaration should necessarily include and spell out the obligations of the States regarding the realization of the human right to peace and each of its elements, as previously identified.

Among them, States should urgently reform the Security Council so it can assume effectively its responsibilities concerning the maintenance of international peace and security, as stated in Art. 13.8 of the Santiago Declaration. The urgency of this reform is justified more than ever, given the extremely serious context of international crisis, marked by an unprecedented arms race and warlike escalation, with its aftermaths of death and destruction.

Finally, Article 4 of the draft declaration of the Chairperson-Rapporteur establishes that the declaration cannot be understood in a line contrary to the Charter of the United Nations, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and relevant international and regional instruments.

We consider more accurate the final provisions contained in Article 14 of the Advisory Committee Declaration on the Right to Peace.

Furthermore, Article 4 should foresee the establishment of a monitoring body of the future Declaration that, in our view, should be a working group of independent experts on the human right to peace, to be appointed by the General Assembly.

In conclusion, the undersigning organisations request once again the Working Group to initiate a real negotiation of the future Declaration of the United Nations on the Human Right to Peace, taking into account its essential elements, as developed both by the Advisory Committee Declaration of 2012 and the Santiago Declaration of 2010.

We believe that the future UN Declaration on the human right to peace would require a normative development that would constitute a clear departure from political declarations of the past, thus being a significant step forward in the development of

9 In accordance with Article 56 of the UN Charter: “All Members pledge themselves to take joint and separate action in co-operation with the Organization for the achievement of the purposes set forth in Article 55”. Art. 55.c of the Charter includes the duty of the United Nations to promote “universal respect for, and observance of, human rights and fundamental freedoms for all without distinction as to race, sex, language, or religion”. Thus, it is Charter-based mandate imposed to both the United Nations and all its Member States.

international human rights law, which is the basis to achieve freedom, justice and peace in the world10.

Geneva, 20 April 2015.
Spanish Society for International Human Rights Law. International Observatory of the Human Right to Peace.

DECLARACIÓN CONJUNTA DE LAS OSC

3o PERÍODO DE SESIONES DEL GRUPO DE TRABAJO SOBRE EL DERECHO A LA PAZ

Sr. presidente:

Formulo la siguiente declaración en nombre de las organizaciones de la sociedad civil que la suscriben:

En mayo de 2014 el presidente-relator del grupo de trabajo sobre el derecho a la paz presentó su primer proyecto de Declaración de las Naciones Unidas sobre el Derecho a la Paz, que fue objeto de debate durante el segundo período de sesiones del grupo de trabajo, celebrado del 30 de junio al 4 de julio de 2014.

En ese mismo período de sesiones, las organizaciones de la sociedad civil manifestamos nuestra decepción con el texto propuesto, pues no reconocía de manera explícita el derecho humano a la paz, ni suponía avances en el estado actual del derecho internacional1. A pesar de ello, el debate en el seno del grupo de trabajo no aportó cambios sustanciales al proyecto del presidente-relator.

Desde entonces, las organizaciones de la sociedad civil hemos manifestado nuestra insatisfacción ante el proceso de codificación basada en tres motivos principales2:

  • –  En primer lugar, el proyecto del presidente-relator se apartaba del mandato del grupo de trabajo que, conforme a la resolución 20/15 del Consejo de Derechos Humanos, de 5 de julio de 2012, consistía en “negociar progresivamente un proyecto de declaración de las Naciones Unidas sobre el derecho a la paz, sobre la base del proyecto presentado por el Comité Asesor…”.
  • –  En segundo lugar, al no reconocer el derecho humano a la paz como derecho autónomo, el proyecto del presidente-relator no suponía ningún avance en el estado actual del derecho internacional de los derechos humanos. Al contrario, suponía un retroceso con respecto a las Declaraciones de la Asamblea General sobre la Preparación de las Sociedades para Vivir en Paz (1978) y sobre el Derecho de los Pueblos a la Paz (1984).
  • –  En tercer lugar, dado que no se contemplaba ningún órgano de supervisión, no se garantizaba el cumplimiento de la futura declaración, quedando ésta limitada a una simple declaración de intenciones.

    El segundo proyecto presentado por el presidente-relator ante el tercer período de sesiones del grupo de trabajo3 adolece de los mismos defectos anteriormente señalados. Si bien añade nuevos elementos relevantes en su preámbulo, ahora es más evidente su descompensación con la parte dispositiva.

    En particular, celebramos las referencias del preámbulo, inter alia, a la Declaración sobre la Preparación de las Sociedades para Vivir en Paz, la Declaración sobre el Derecho de los Pueblos a la Paz, y la Declaración y Programa de Acción sobre una

    1 Véase informe del segundo período de sesiones: A/HRC/27/63. Distribuido el 8 de julio de 2014.

    2 Véanse exposiciones escritas conjuntas presentadas al Consejo de Derechos Humanos en su 27o y 28o período de sesiones: A/HRC/27/NGO/100 y A/HRC/28/NGO/40.

    3 20-24 de abril de 2015.

Cultura de Paz4, así como la referencia al concepto de paz positiva5, y muy especialmente la afirmación del derecho a vivir en paz6, expresada en los mismos términos que la Declaración de 1978.

Sin embargo, consideramos que el articulado de la declaración sigue siendo insuficiente, al limitarse a cuatro artículos, dos de ellos dedicados a su aplicación e interpretación.

La modificación más relevante con respecto al proyecto anterior se encuentra en el artículo 1, el cual afirma ahora que “Toda persona tiene derecho a disfrutar de la paz y la seguridad, los derechos humanos y el desarrollo”.

Consideramos que tal redacción no supone ningún avance en el estado actual del derecho internacional de los derechos humanos, pues en 1978 la Asamblea General ya había reconocido el derecho de toda persona a vivir en paz, y en 1984 proclamó solemnemente el “derecho sagrado a la paz” de todos los pueblos.

Por tanto, proponemos volver a la Declaración sobre el derecho a la paz que había aprobado en abril de 2012 el Comité Asesor7, cuyo artículo 1 reconoce que “las personas y los pueblos tienen un derecho a la paz. Este derecho se implementará sin ningún tipo de distinción o discriminación….”.

A continuación, la citada Declaración definió los elementos esenciales del derecho humano a la paz, siguiendo los desarrollados por la sociedad civil internacional en la Declaración de Santiago sobre el Derecho Humano a la Paz, de 10 de diciembre de 2010. En ambos documentos se identificaron los siguientes elementos esenciales, que debieran ser incorporados al articulado del proyecto de declaración del presidente- relator: el derecho a la seguridad humana; el derecho al desarme; el derecho a la educación y capacitación para la paz; el derecho a la objeción de conciencia al servicio militar; el derecho a la resistencia y oposición a la opresión; el deber de regular las actuaciones y responsabilidades de las empresas militares y de seguridad privadas, así como de las operaciones de mantenimiento de la paz; el derecho al desarrollo; el derecho al medio ambiente; los derechos de las víctimas de violaciones de derechos humanos a conocer la verdad, a la justicia, a la reparación y a obtener garantías de no repetición; los derechos de las personas pertenecientes a grupos vulnerables; y los derechos de los refugiados y de los migrantes.

El artículo 2 establece el deber de los Estados de respetar, implementar y promover la igualdad y la no discriminación, la justicia y el Estado de derecho, y garantizar la libertad frente al temor y la miseria como medio para construir la paz dentro y entre las sociedades.

Celebramos la referencia al concepto de seguridad humana, tal y como fue definido por el PNUD: libertad frente al temor y la miseria8, así como la referencia a principios básicos del Derecho Internacional de los Derechos Humanos como la igualdad y la no discriminación, la justicia y el Estado de derecho. Sin embargo, son principios ya

4 Párrafo preambular 4.
5 Párrafo preambular 9.
6 Párrafo preambular 24.
7 Documento A/HRC/20/31, de 16 de abril de 2012.
8 PNUD, Informe sobre Desarrollo Humano, 1994, p. 27.

afirmados en la Declaración Universal de Derechos Humanos, la Declaración del Milenio, o el Documento Final de la Cumbre Mundial de 2005.

Por tanto, proponemos que tales principios se desarrollen conforme a los artículos 2 y siguientes de la Declaración sobre el Derecho a la Paz del Comité Asesor y los artículos 3 y siguientes de la Declaración de Santiago sobre el Derecho Humano a la Paz.

El artículo 3 impone el deber de tomar medidas apropiadas y sostenibles para actuar, apoyar y ayudar en la realización de la Declaración a las Naciones Unidas y sus organismos especializados, las organizaciones internacionales, regionales, nacionales y locales, así como a la sociedad en general.

Sin embargo, los Estados son los principales deudores del derecho humano a la paz, por lo que no se pueden excluir de la enumeración del artículo 3. Los Estados tienen una responsabilidad primordial en orden al respeto, garantía y realización efectivos de todos los derechos humanos, incluido el derecho humano a la paz. Negar esta responsabilidad o, simplemente, omitir toda mención a ella constituye un claro retroceso en el Derecho Internacional de los Derechos Humanos y menoscaba el alcance del art. 56 de la Carta9.

Por consiguiente, al igual que hacen las Declaraciones de Santiago y del Comité Asesor, el artículo 3 del proyecto del presidente-relator debe necesariamente incluir y concretar las obligaciones de los Estados en la realización del derecho humano a la paz y de cada uno de sus componentes esenciales, arriba identificados.

Entre ellas, los Estados deben reformar urgentemente el Consejo de Seguridad para que pueda asumir eficazmente sus responsabilidades en materia de mantenimiento de la paz y seguridad internacionales, como reclama el art. 13.8 de la Declaración de Santiago. La urgencia de esta reforma está hoy más justificada que nunca, dado el gravísimo contexto de crisis internacional en el que nos encontramos, presidida por una escalada armamentista y belicista sin precedentes, con sus secuelas de muerte y destrucción.

Por último, el artículo 4 del proyecto del presidente-relator establece que la Declaración no podrá ser objeto de una interpretación contraria a la Carta de las Naciones Unidas, la Declaración Universal de Derechos Humanos y los instrumentos internacionales y regionales relevantes.

Nos parecen más precisas las disposiciones finales contenidas en el artículo 14 de la Declaración sobre el Derecho a la Paz del Comité Asesor.

Adicionalmente, el artículo 4 citado debiera prever el establecimiento de un órgano de control de la aplicación de la futura Declaración que, a nuestro juicio, debiera de ser un grupo de trabajo de personas expertas independientes sobre el derecho humano a la paz, nombradas por la Asamblea General.

En conclusión, las organizaciones firmantes solicitamos una vez más al grupo de trabajo que inicie una auténtica negociación de la futura Declaración de las Naciones

9 En efecto, conforme al art. 56 de la Carta “Todos los Miembros se comprometen a tomar medidas conjunta o separadamente, en cooperación con la Organización, para la realización de los propósitos consignados en el Artículo 55”. Precisamente, el apartado c) del art. 55 de la Carta contempla el deber de las Naciones Unidas de promover “el respeto universal a los derechos humanos y a las libertades fundamentales de todos, sin hacer distinción por motivos de raza, sexo, idioma o religión, y la efectividad de tales derechos y libertades”. En suma, estamos ante un mandato que la Carta impone tanto a las Naciones Unidas como a todos sus Estados Miembros.

Unidas sobre el Derecho Humano a la Paz, teniendo presentes los elementos esenciales que componen el derecho humano a la paz, que han sido desarrollados tanto por el Comité Asesor en su Declaración de 2012, como por la sociedad civil en la Declaración de Santiago de 2010.

Creemos que la futura Declaración de las Naciones Unidas sobre el derecho humano a la paz requiere un desarrollo normativo que la distancie de declaraciones políticas del pasado, a la vez que constituirá un paso significativo en el desarrollo del Derecho Internacional de los Derechos Humanos, sobre cuya base se conseguirá obtener la libertad, la justicia y la paz en el mundo10.

Ginebra, 20 de abril de 2015.
Asociación Española para el Derecho Internacional de los Derechos Humanos Observatorio Internacional para el Derecho Humano a la Paz

Human Rights Right to Peace Human Rights Council Working Group on the Right to Peace Statement

Participate in the debate! Share your thoughts!

comments

 
© 2014 WILPF International | All rights reserved | About this website | webmaster